FULL AUDIO KIT FOR $32?! HOLY CRAP – Tonor BM 700 Microphone Kit Review


This is the Tonor BM-700 XLR microphone. Or as the Amazon listing says, the TONOR XRL
to 3.5mm Podcasting Studio Recording Condenser Microphone for Computer with Adjustable Microphone
Suspension Boom Scissor Arm Stand and Microphone kits. …what? And, yes, it really says XRL instead of XLR. Questionable Amazon SEO tactics aside, this
is actually pretty cool – for just $32 US, you get basically everything you need for
some decent basic condenser microphone audio for YouTube, streaming, podcasting and so
on. Instead of just coming with the microphone,
in the box you also get a shock mount (your listeners’ ears will thank you for this),
a wind screen and a pop filter – don’t use both, but whichever you use will also earn
gratitude from your listeners’ ears – and a scissor arm and desk mount for it, along
with a decent-quality XLR to 3.5mm cable if you don’t have a XLR interface setup, and
a 3.5mm USB sound card – though I will say to not use that in a little bit. In terms of bang for your buck, it’s hard
to beat this complete package for only $32. It really is. Granted, for this price you’re not getting
the highest-quality components – the microphone arm and mounts are cheap and will break over
time if you’re too rough with it, and won’t hold a heavy mic if you choose to upgrade
later. BUT they are plenty good enough to get started
with audio. Setup is very straightforward – tighten the
desk mount on the edge of your desk, slide the arm in and tighten the securing knob,
attach the shock mount to the arm thread, and add the microphone into the shock mount. Then use your choice of the pop filter or
windscreen. The pop filter and windscreen achieve similar
results – lowering the impact of plosives – but the pop filter will do a better job. It, however, requires 2 inches or more of
space between it and the mic, and overall that setup takes way more space than just
sliding the windscreen overtop the mic. It’s also worth noting that this is a side
address microphone. Audio will only be picked up properly from
the front side with the Tonor label on it, not from the back or the top of the capsule. You, then, have a choice of hooking it up
directly via XLR to a phantom power-providing interface or mixer, or using the XLR to 3.5mm
cable to your computer motherboard. The USB sound card is completely useless,
however. I tried it out with 2 different desktops and
a laptop with USB 2.0 and 3.0 ports and all I got out of it was this nasty static mess. The mic sounds pretty good! It sounds best hooked up to a proper setup
via XLR, but it is still completely usable via the 3.5mm connection ran to your computer’s
microphone input. Here’s a XLR-3.5mm cable mic sample without
any audio processing, and then a quick copy of it with some audio processing so you can
see what can be done with it: This is a microphone test using the Tonor
BM-700 hooked up via XLR to 3.5mm cable to the pink microphone in jack on a desktop computer. This is a test. This is a test. Test test 1-2-3. Hello everyone, my name’s Adam or EposVox
and this is a microphone test. HELLO. Now this is without the pop filter or the
windscreen, as I wanted to get as crystal clear quality as possible, and I just left
it upstairs. But, this is a microphone test. Hello everyone. How’s it going? This is a microphone test using the Tonor
BM-700 hooked up via XLR to 3.5mm cable to the pink microphone in jack on a desktop computer. This is a test. This is a test. Test test 1-2-3. Hello everyone, my name’s Adam or EposVox
and this is a microphone test. HELLO. Now this is without the pop filter or the
windscreen, as I wanted to get as crystal clear quality as possible, and I just left
it upstairs. But, this is a microphone test. Hello everyone. How’s it going? And here’s a test of it hooked up via XLR
to my main audio rack with no processing applied: This is a microphone test using the Tonor
BM-700 condenser microphone hooked up via XLR to my audio processing rack like I would
a normal microphone. This is a microphone test. Hi everyone, how’s it going? My name’s Adam or EposVox and you’re listening
to a microphone test in my normal studio setup. Since this is a condenser microphone, this
is a test, we’re going to do a keyboard typing test – and there you go, you can probably
hear the keystrokes. This is a test. Test test 1-2-3. BASS. Lastly, here’s a raw and processed test
comparing it to the Audio Technica AT2020 mic – a $50 to $80 mic that I usually recommend
as the “budget” option. Okay switching over here, I have the mic set
up in a vocal booth so the sound is as isolated as I can get it pretty much here in my home
studio. And we have the mic hooked up to my Focusrite
Scarlett 2i2, which is back behind me hooked up to my laptop. And we’re actually going to be doing a comparison
to the Audio Technica AT2020. So this is what the BM-700 sounds like running
through a Focusrite Scarlett 2i2 with phantom power. And we’re going to replay both these clips
with processing, but this is raw just first. So this is a test. Test test 1-2-3. Let’s switch on over to the AT2020. And now here we have the Audio Technica AT2020
with the exact same setup here in the vocal booth with the Scarlett 2i2 hooked up to my
laptop. This is a microphone test. The AT2020 is a little bit of a more expensive
microphone. It still falls in the “budget mic” category
for me. You can pick it up anywhere from about $50
to $100, but it is a little bit – clearly a bit more expensive than this setup. And it only comes with the microphone itself,
not the whole microphone setup. And we’re actually going to be doing a comparison
to the Audio Technica AT2020. So this is what the BM-700 sounds like running
through a Focusrite Scarlett 2i2 with phantom power. And we’re going to replay both these clips
with processing. And this is with processing second. So this is a test. Test test 1-2-3. Let’s switch on over to the AT2020. But since this does fall in the budget microphone
category that I usually recommend, I wanted to do a comparison. And again, I will be playing the raw sample
and a processed sample so you can compare what they sound like together. Because getting the best sound out of your
microphone involves adding a little EQ and compression. If you’re interested in how to do that, I
do have a tutorial up on my channel, check it out. This is a pretty capable mic, and if you’re
looking for a cheap audio setup for your content creation, I can definitely recommend looking
into this kit – just keep in mind the USB adapter probably won’t work for you. I know some of you have been suggesting I
take a look at the BM-800 microphone and I hope I can get to it soon, but this definitely
looks to be a strong competitor. I’m EposVox, here to make tech easier to
understand and more fun via free educational videos and I hope you enjoyed this review. If you did, smash the like button, get subscribed
for more awesome tech videos, and I’ll see you next time.

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